Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge

Ages:Undergraduate, Graduate, Professional

Types:Submission, Presentation

Categories:Cyber Security, Global Affairs, STEM, US Government Affairs

Scope:International

This competition has not yet posted any deadlines.

The Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is an annual cyber policy competition for students across the globe to compete in developing national security policy recommendations tackling a fictional cyber catastrophe. Now entering its fifth year, the Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is a one-of-a-kind competition designed to provide students across academic disciplines with a deeper understanding of the policy challenges associated with cyber crisis and conflict. Part interactive learning experience and part competitive scenario exercise, it challenges teams to respond to a realistic, evolving cyberattack and analyze the threat it poses to national, international, and private sector interests.

Students have a unique opportunity to interact with expert mentors and high-level cyber professionals while developing valuable skills in policy analysis and presentation. The competition has already engaged over 700 students from universities in the United States, United Kingdom, France, United Arab Emirates, Poland, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia.

 

Before attending the onsite Challenge, teams of students will work with their coaches at home to refine their policy making skills and prepare for a presentation at the Cyber Challenge. Student teams will be challenged to respond to an evolving scenario involving a major cyberattack and analyze the threat it poses to state, military, and private sector interests. Teams will be judged based on the quality of their policy responses, their decision-making processes, and their oral presentation to a panel of judges. Along the way, teams will work with coaches at their home institution to develop their policy skills; feedback from expert panels of judges will ensure that all participants have an opportunity to improve their skills; and the collaborative environment will provide networking opportunities during the competition. The 9/12 Cyber Challenge takes place in several locations internationally. Each location has a slightly different challenge for students. In Washington, DC, in partnership with American University's School of International Service, student teams confront a serious cybersecurity breach of national and international importance. Teams will compose policy recommendations and justify their decision-making process, considering the role and implications for relevant civilian, military, law enforcement, and private sector entities and updating the recommendations as the scenario evolves. In Geneva, Switzerland, in partnership with the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), students respond to a major cyber-attack on European networks. Competitors will provide recommendations balancing individual national approaches and a collective crisis management response, considering capabilities, policies, and governance structures of NATO, EU, and individual nations. The competition fosters a culture of cooperation and a better understanding of these organizations and their member states in responding to cyberattacks.

Each round of the competition will be judged by a panel of three cyber policy experts. To standardize scoring and encourage consensus, all judges will score the teams based on a common grading scorecard. Judges may vary between sessions and rounds subject to their availability. All teams will be evaluated based on three main dimensions of their responses: evaluation of the scenario problem; analysis of policy response alternatives presented; and quality of writing or oral presentation. These dimensions will be scored based on a common grading scorecard and instructions shared by all the judges. The resulting numerical scores will be used to determine the winners of each round. At the conclusion of each round, teams will be provided specific, detailed feedback on strengths and areas of improvement for their policy and presentation skills. Grading scorecards and guidelines will be distributed to all teams in advance of the competition.
This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Website: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/brent-scowcroft-center/cyber-statecraft/cyber-9-12

Managing Organization: Atlantic Council

Contact:
Anni Piiparinen
APiiparinen@AtlanticCouncil.org
202-778-4972

Entry Fee: $0

Eligibility:
All students currently enrolled in an undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, professional, or law program on the date of the registration deadline are eligible to compete. There is no explicit major, coursework, or prior experience in cyber conflict necessary to compete, but successful applicants will have a strong link between cyber conflict policy and their current academic interest. Students with an interest in cyber conflict policy from around the world are invited to apply to compete. However, the Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge cannot guarantee any funds to support team travel and accommodation expenses. Applicants are encouraged to inquire about funding from their home institutions. Each team must include four students. Teams that register less than four competitors may be considered at the discretion of the Competition Director, space permitting. There are no requirements for team composition based on the majors or education level of team members. Each team must also recruit a faculty member to act as their team coach and mentor. While coaches are not required to take part in the competition event, their participation is necessary to ensure that all teams have access to assistance in crafting their responses.

This competition has not yet posted any deadlines.

Overview

The Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is an annual cyber policy competition for students across the globe to compete in developing national security policy recommendations tackling a fictional cyber catastrophe. Now entering its fifth year, the Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is a one-of-a-kind competition designed to provide students across academic disciplines with a deeper understanding of the policy challenges associated with cyber crisis and conflict. Part interactive learning experience and part competitive scenario exercise, it challenges teams to respond to a realistic, evolving cyberattack and analyze the threat it poses to national, international, and private sector interests.

Students have a unique opportunity to interact with expert mentors and high-level cyber professionals while developing valuable skills in policy analysis and presentation. The competition has already engaged over 700 students from universities in the United States, United Kingdom, France, United Arab Emirates, Poland, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia.

 

Process

Before attending the onsite Challenge, teams of students will work with their coaches at home to refine their policy making skills and prepare for a presentation at the Cyber Challenge. Student teams will be challenged to respond to an evolving scenario involving a major cyberattack and analyze the threat it poses to state, military, and private sector interests. Teams will be judged based on the quality of their policy responses, their decision-making processes, and their oral presentation to a panel of judges. Along the way, teams will work with coaches at their home institution to develop their policy skills; feedback from expert panels of judges will ensure that all participants have an opportunity to improve their skills; and the collaborative environment will provide networking opportunities during the competition. The 9/12 Cyber Challenge takes place in several locations internationally. Each location has a slightly different challenge for students. In Washington, DC, in partnership with American University's School of International Service, student teams confront a serious cybersecurity breach of national and international importance. Teams will compose policy recommendations and justify their decision-making process, considering the role and implications for relevant civilian, military, law enforcement, and private sector entities and updating the recommendations as the scenario evolves. In Geneva, Switzerland, in partnership with the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), students respond to a major cyber-attack on European networks. Competitors will provide recommendations balancing individual national approaches and a collective crisis management response, considering capabilities, policies, and governance structures of NATO, EU, and individual nations. The competition fosters a culture of cooperation and a better understanding of these organizations and their member states in responding to cyberattacks.

Criteria

Each round of the competition will be judged by a panel of three cyber policy experts. To standardize scoring and encourage consensus, all judges will score the teams based on a common grading scorecard. Judges may vary between sessions and rounds subject to their availability. All teams will be evaluated based on three main dimensions of their responses: evaluation of the scenario problem; analysis of policy response alternatives presented; and quality of writing or oral presentation. These dimensions will be scored based on a common grading scorecard and instructions shared by all the judges. The resulting numerical scores will be used to determine the winners of each round. At the conclusion of each round, teams will be provided specific, detailed feedback on strengths and areas of improvement for their policy and presentation skills. Grading scorecards and guidelines will be distributed to all teams in advance of the competition.

Awards

This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Participate

Website: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/brent-scowcroft-center/cyber-statecraft/cyber-9-12

Managing Organization: Atlantic Council

Contact:
Anni Piiparinen
APiiparinen@AtlanticCouncil.org
202-778-4972

Entry Fee: $0

Eligibility:
All students currently enrolled in an undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, professional, or law program on the date of the registration deadline are eligible to compete. There is no explicit major, coursework, or prior experience in cyber conflict necessary to compete, but successful applicants will have a strong link between cyber conflict policy and their current academic interest. Students with an interest in cyber conflict policy from around the world are invited to apply to compete. However, the Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge cannot guarantee any funds to support team travel and accommodation expenses. Applicants are encouraged to inquire about funding from their home institutions. Each team must include four students. Teams that register less than four competitors may be considered at the discretion of the Competition Director, space permitting. There are no requirements for team composition based on the majors or education level of team members. Each team must also recruit a faculty member to act as their team coach and mentor. While coaches are not required to take part in the competition event, their participation is necessary to ensure that all teams have access to assistance in crafting their responses.

Deadlines

This competition has not yet posted any deadlines.