International Aerial Robotics Competition

Ages:Undergraduate, Graduate

Types:Tournament, Performance

Categories:Coding & Computer Science, Robotics, STEM

Scope:International

Registration

Entry form is available online at:  http://www.aerialroboticscompetition.org/entryform.php

Note that entries for MISSION 10 are opening up soon.  MISSION 9 entries are closed now that MISSION 9 has been completed.

Contact


competitionsciences.algebra299@passinbox.com

The International Aerial Robotics Competition (IARC) began in 1991 on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology and is the longest running university-based robotics competition in the world. Since 1991, collegiate teams with the backing of industry and government have fielded autonomous flying robots in an attempt to perform missions requiring robotic behaviors never before exhibited by a flying machine. In 1990, the term “aerial robotics” was coined by competition creator Prof. Robert Michelson to describe a new class of small highly intelligent flying machines. The successive years of competition saw these aerial robots grow in their capabilities from vehicles that could at first barely maintain themselves in the air, to the most recent automatons which are self-stable, self-navigating, and able to interact with their environment—especially objects on the ground.

The primary goal of the competition has been to provide a reason for the state of the art in aerial robotics to move forward. Challenges set before the international collegiate community have been geared towards producing advances in the state of the art at an increasingly aggressive pace. From 1991 through 2023, a total of 9 missions have been proposed. Each of them involved fully autonomous robotic behavior that was undemonstrated at the time and impossible for any robotic system fielded anywhere in the world, even by the most sophisticated military robots belonging to the super powers.

The primary purpose of the IARC is to move the state-of-the-art in aerial robotics forward through the creation of significant and useful mission challenges that are considered 'impossible' at the time that they are proposed. The IARC is not a "spectator sport," but rather a "technology sport." The new MISSION 10 is soon to be released. (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Aerial_Robotics_Competition )

The upcoming MISSION 10 challenges university-based teams to demonstrate new behaviors, some of which are extensions of past missions and some that have never before been attempted in any past IARC mission. These include:

  • Autonomous flight of a (small) swarm of miniature autonomous aerial vehicles (1 pound weight category)
  • Direction of a swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles by a human, using only gestures or voice commands (no control station)
  • A swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles capable of obstacle avoidance and simultaneous flight coordination
  • A swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles that can sense targets and mark them physically and/or digitally (mapping in memory) with little redundancy
  • Ability to plan a safe path through a hazardous area based on the collective target map, and to communicate the safe path to the human
  • Rapid survey and decision making
  • Use ONLY onboard computing (no data links except for kill switch and safety pilot override)
  • Allow a "person-at-risk" to navigate a large hazardous area with obstacles (the size of a football field) In 10 minutes or less
Due to the difficulty of the tasks to be demonstrated, as with prior missions, MISSION 10 is expected to require several years before a team is able to complete the mission. Due to the complexity of the arena, the International Aerial Robotics Competition Mission 10 will be conducted at a single venue in the Unites States of America. The location of this venue will be announced at the Official IARC website. When the the soon-to-be-released MISSION 10 Official Rules are released at http://www.aerialroboticscompetition.org/ detailed instructions about how to enter will be found there.

During any competition year, each team will be allowed 3 attempts to demonstrate that it can perform the mission. Before attempts begin, each team must have demonstrated that its vehicle can fly autonomously (including takeoff and landing), and can be controlled without use of a ground station by its operator using only voice commands and/or gestures. This is “qualification”. Teams unable to meet this minimum qualification requirement, or will not be allowed to compete. Once a team has demonstrated these qualifying capabilities, it will then be allowed to compete. The team conducting the mission successfully in the least time will be declared the winner. The minimum prize award is $10,000 (not including added incentive awards from government and industry), and grows by $10,000 for each year that the mission is unable to be completed.

Website: http://www.aerialroboticscompetition.org/

Managing Organization: RoboNation (formerly the AUVSI Foundation)

Contact:

competitionsciences.algebra299@passinbox.com

Eligibility:
University students across the world. Teams must be based at a university and must have an identified academic faculty advisor. Only one team per university unit is allowed to compete, and each team must have uniquely-developed aerial robotic hardware (no sharing of aerial robots). Teams may be comprised of a combination of students, faculty, industrial partners, or government partners. Students may be undergraduate and/or graduate students. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged (EE, AE, ME, etc.). Members from industry, government agencies (or universities, in the case of faculty) may participate, however full-time students must be associated with each team. The student members of a joint team must make significant contributions to the development of their entry. Only the student component of each team will be eligible for the cash awards. Since MISSION 10 of the International Aerial Robotics Competition will run until the mission is complete, anyone who is enrolled in a college or university as a full-time student (as defined by their university) any time during or after the calendar year that the team originally made application for MISSION 10, is qualified to be a “student” team member.

Overview

The International Aerial Robotics Competition (IARC) began in 1991 on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology and is the longest running university-based robotics competition in the world. Since 1991, collegiate teams with the backing of industry and government have fielded autonomous flying robots in an attempt to perform missions requiring robotic behaviors never before exhibited by a flying machine. In 1990, the term “aerial robotics” was coined by competition creator Prof. Robert Michelson to describe a new class of small highly intelligent flying machines. The successive years of competition saw these aerial robots grow in their capabilities from vehicles that could at first barely maintain themselves in the air, to the most recent automatons which are self-stable, self-navigating, and able to interact with their environment—especially objects on the ground.

The primary goal of the competition has been to provide a reason for the state of the art in aerial robotics to move forward. Challenges set before the international collegiate community have been geared towards producing advances in the state of the art at an increasingly aggressive pace. From 1991 through 2023, a total of 9 missions have been proposed. Each of them involved fully autonomous robotic behavior that was undemonstrated at the time and impossible for any robotic system fielded anywhere in the world, even by the most sophisticated military robots belonging to the super powers.

The primary purpose of the IARC is to move the state-of-the-art in aerial robotics forward through the creation of significant and useful mission challenges that are considered 'impossible' at the time that they are proposed. The IARC is not a "spectator sport," but rather a "technology sport." The new MISSION 10 is soon to be released. (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Aerial_Robotics_Competition )

Process

The upcoming MISSION 10 challenges university-based teams to demonstrate new behaviors, some of which are extensions of past missions and some that have never before been attempted in any past IARC mission. These include:
  • Autonomous flight of a (small) swarm of miniature autonomous aerial vehicles (1 pound weight category)
  • Direction of a swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles by a human, using only gestures or voice commands (no control station)
  • A swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles capable of obstacle avoidance and simultaneous flight coordination
  • A swarm of small autonomous aerial vehicles that can sense targets and mark them physically and/or digitally (mapping in memory) with little redundancy
  • Ability to plan a safe path through a hazardous area based on the collective target map, and to communicate the safe path to the human
  • Rapid survey and decision making
  • Use ONLY onboard computing (no data links except for kill switch and safety pilot override)
  • Allow a "person-at-risk" to navigate a large hazardous area with obstacles (the size of a football field) In 10 minutes or less
Due to the difficulty of the tasks to be demonstrated, as with prior missions, MISSION 10 is expected to require several years before a team is able to complete the mission. Due to the complexity of the arena, the International Aerial Robotics Competition Mission 10 will be conducted at a single venue in the Unites States of America. The location of this venue will be announced at the Official IARC website. When the the soon-to-be-released MISSION 10 Official Rules are released at http://www.aerialroboticscompetition.org/ detailed instructions about how to enter will be found there.

Criteria

During any competition year, each team will be allowed 3 attempts to demonstrate that it can perform the mission. Before attempts begin, each team must have demonstrated that its vehicle can fly autonomously (including takeoff and landing), and can be controlled without use of a ground station by its operator using only voice commands and/or gestures. This is “qualification”. Teams unable to meet this minimum qualification requirement, or will not be allowed to compete. Once a team has demonstrated these qualifying capabilities, it will then be allowed to compete. The team conducting the mission successfully in the least time will be declared the winner. The minimum prize award is $10,000 (not including added incentive awards from government and industry), and grows by $10,000 for each year that the mission is unable to be completed.

Participate

Website: http://www.aerialroboticscompetition.org/

Managing Organization: RoboNation (formerly the AUVSI Foundation)

Contact:

competitionsciences.algebra299@passinbox.com

Eligibility:
University students across the world. Teams must be based at a university and must have an identified academic faculty advisor. Only one team per university unit is allowed to compete, and each team must have uniquely-developed aerial robotic hardware (no sharing of aerial robots). Teams may be comprised of a combination of students, faculty, industrial partners, or government partners. Students may be undergraduate and/or graduate students. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged (EE, AE, ME, etc.). Members from industry, government agencies (or universities, in the case of faculty) may participate, however full-time students must be associated with each team. The student members of a joint team must make significant contributions to the development of their entry. Only the student component of each team will be eligible for the cash awards. Since MISSION 10 of the International Aerial Robotics Competition will run until the mission is complete, anyone who is enrolled in a college or university as a full-time student (as defined by their university) any time during or after the calendar year that the team originally made application for MISSION 10, is qualified to be a “student” team member.