Exploravision

Ages:Elementary, Middle School, High School

Type:Submission

Category:STEM

Scope:National

February 8, 2019 Registration Closes

The ExploraVision competition for K-12 students engages the next generation in real world problem solving with a strong emphasis on STEM. ExploraVision challenges students envision and communicate new technology 20 years in the future through collaborative brainstorming and research of current science and technology. ExploraVision is a science competition that goes beyond the typical student science competition and into what it takes to bring ideas to reality. A teacher will sponsor and lead his/her students as they work in groups of 2 – 4 to simulate real research and development. A teacher will guide his or her students as they pick a current technology, research it, envision what it might look like in 20 years, and describe the development steps, pros & cons, and obstacles. Past winners have envisioned technologies ranging from a hand-held food allergen detector to a new device to help people who have lost limbs regain movement in real time.

Students must complete a project describing a science or technology concept 20 years in the future. Each project must include an abstract, description, bibliography, and five sample Web pages. I. Abstract; An abstract of no more than 150 words that summarizes the proposed future technology and other relevant information must proceed other project components. The Abstract should be on a separate page and does not count as part of the Description components II. Description; A project Description section does not exceed 11 pages and may be combination of text and art work. It must include the following section with heading clearly labeled and be in the following order:

  1. Present Technology*: An overview of the present form of the technology including scientific principles involved in its functioning. A problem definition or limitation of this present technology that you address in your ExploraVision project.
  2. History: Research and description of the history of the technology from its inception.
  3. Future Technology: Description of the team's vision for what this technology would be like in 20 years, including scientific principles involved in developing the technology.
  4. Breakthroughs*: Research and description of breakthroughs that are necessary to make the future technology design a reality. Description of why this future technology doesn't exist today. (Choose one of your required breakthroughs and describe an investigation that would have to be planned and carried out to test your ExploraVision project. If possible, include the kind of data or measurements that would be collected in the investigation.)
  5. Design Process*: Description of three alternative ideas of features the team considered for their project. The ideas and features should be directly related to the project. Describe why the team rejected each feature and idea in favor of the ones in the submitted technology. Describe how your future technology feature is better than the rejected design feature.
  6. Consequences*: Description of recognition that all technologies have positive and negative consequences including the potential positive and negative consequences of the new technology on society.
III. Bibliography; A list of all sources and references used in researching the chosen technology. Sources must be clearly labeled and include title, author, publisher, and copyright date. Footnotes are encouraged, but not required. The Bibliography is not counted as part of the 11-page limit for the Description section. IV. Sample Web Pages*; Team members must draw five sample web pages that communicate and promote their future technology vision. Web pages may be hand-drawn or computer-generated (e.g., powerpoint) and may include text, pictures, photographs and diagrams. They should relate to material presented in the written description and illustrate the attributes of the chose technology. One web page should be devoted to a model or visual representation of the technology that could be used to create a prototype for display. The model should help others visualize the design and communicate design features. Include a description of limitation s of the model. No need to create an actual website or a prototype untill a team become a Regional winner. * Section central to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Each category will be judged separately, based on the abilities of students in those grades. Students in a lower grade may be part of a team competing in the next-higher category. However, students may not move down to a lower grade-level category. ExploraVision has four categories:
  • Primary Level (Grades K – 3)
  • Upper Elementary Level (Grades 4 – 6)
  • Middle Level (Grades 7 – 9)
  • High School Level (Grades 10 – 12)
The following maximum points are allocated to each part of the project:
  • Present technology:  10 points
  • History:                         10 points
  • Future technology:      20 points
  • Breakthroughs:           15 points
  • Design process:         10 points
  • Consequences:          10 points
  • Bibliography:                 5 points
  • Sample Web pages:  20 points
Projects will be judged on creativity, scientific accuracy, communication and feasibility of vision. Judges will award higher scores to projects that are different from those that have won previously. To ensure an impartial selection process, the judges will not see student, teacher or school names. A judging committee will select 24 teams, one for each grade-level category in each of the six regions  
This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Website: http://www.exploravision.org

Managing Organization: National Science Teachers Association

Contact:

exploravision@nsta.org

Entry Fee: $0

This competition is open to students in Elementary, Middle School, High School.

February 8, 2019 Registration Closes

Overview

The ExploraVision competition for K-12 students engages the next generation in real world problem solving with a strong emphasis on STEM. ExploraVision challenges students envision and communicate new technology 20 years in the future through collaborative brainstorming and research of current science and technology. ExploraVision is a science competition that goes beyond the typical student science competition and into what it takes to bring ideas to reality. A teacher will sponsor and lead his/her students as they work in groups of 2 – 4 to simulate real research and development. A teacher will guide his or her students as they pick a current technology, research it, envision what it might look like in 20 years, and describe the development steps, pros & cons, and obstacles. Past winners have envisioned technologies ranging from a hand-held food allergen detector to a new device to help people who have lost limbs regain movement in real time.

Process

Students must complete a project describing a science or technology concept 20 years in the future. Each project must include an abstract, description, bibliography, and five sample Web pages. I. Abstract; An abstract of no more than 150 words that summarizes the proposed future technology and other relevant information must proceed other project components. The Abstract should be on a separate page and does not count as part of the Description components II. Description; A project Description section does not exceed 11 pages and may be combination of text and art work. It must include the following section with heading clearly labeled and be in the following order:
  1. Present Technology*: An overview of the present form of the technology including scientific principles involved in its functioning. A problem definition or limitation of this present technology that you address in your ExploraVision project.
  2. History: Research and description of the history of the technology from its inception.
  3. Future Technology: Description of the team's vision for what this technology would be like in 20 years, including scientific principles involved in developing the technology.
  4. Breakthroughs*: Research and description of breakthroughs that are necessary to make the future technology design a reality. Description of why this future technology doesn't exist today. (Choose one of your required breakthroughs and describe an investigation that would have to be planned and carried out to test your ExploraVision project. If possible, include the kind of data or measurements that would be collected in the investigation.)
  5. Design Process*: Description of three alternative ideas of features the team considered for their project. The ideas and features should be directly related to the project. Describe why the team rejected each feature and idea in favor of the ones in the submitted technology. Describe how your future technology feature is better than the rejected design feature.
  6. Consequences*: Description of recognition that all technologies have positive and negative consequences including the potential positive and negative consequences of the new technology on society.
III. Bibliography; A list of all sources and references used in researching the chosen technology. Sources must be clearly labeled and include title, author, publisher, and copyright date. Footnotes are encouraged, but not required. The Bibliography is not counted as part of the 11-page limit for the Description section. IV. Sample Web Pages*; Team members must draw five sample web pages that communicate and promote their future technology vision. Web pages may be hand-drawn or computer-generated (e.g., powerpoint) and may include text, pictures, photographs and diagrams. They should relate to material presented in the written description and illustrate the attributes of the chose technology. One web page should be devoted to a model or visual representation of the technology that could be used to create a prototype for display. The model should help others visualize the design and communicate design features. Include a description of limitation s of the model. No need to create an actual website or a prototype untill a team become a Regional winner. * Section central to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Criteria

Each category will be judged separately, based on the abilities of students in those grades. Students in a lower grade may be part of a team competing in the next-higher category. However, students may not move down to a lower grade-level category. ExploraVision has four categories:
  • Primary Level (Grades K – 3)
  • Upper Elementary Level (Grades 4 – 6)
  • Middle Level (Grades 7 – 9)
  • High School Level (Grades 10 – 12)
The following maximum points are allocated to each part of the project:
  • Present technology:  10 points
  • History:                         10 points
  • Future technology:      20 points
  • Breakthroughs:           15 points
  • Design process:         10 points
  • Consequences:          10 points
  • Bibliography:                 5 points
  • Sample Web pages:  20 points
Projects will be judged on creativity, scientific accuracy, communication and feasibility of vision. Judges will award higher scores to projects that are different from those that have won previously. To ensure an impartial selection process, the judges will not see student, teacher or school names. A judging committee will select 24 teams, one for each grade-level category in each of the six regions  

Awards

This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Participate

Website: http://www.exploravision.org

Managing Organization: National Science Teachers Association

Contact:

exploravision@nsta.org

Entry Fee: $0

This competition is open to students in Elementary, Middle School, High School.

Deadlines

February 8, 2019 Registration Closes