Canadian Computing Competition

Ages:High School

Types:Exam, Submission

Categories:Coding & Computer Science, STEM

Scope:International

Registration Closes
Feb 4, 2020 12:01am
America/Toronto

The Canadian Computing Competition (CCC) began in 1996 as a forum for high school students in Canada to learn about and enjoy aspects of programming. Top Senior contestants from the CCC are invited to attend the Canadian Computing Olympiad (CCO).

The Canadian Computing Competition (CCC) is a fun challenge for secondary school students with an interest in programming. It is an opportunity for students to test their ability in designing, understanding and implementing algorithms.

The CCC consists of two distinct paper submission divisions: the Junior Division paper and the Senior Division paper. Each paper consists of 5 questions. The range of difficulty increases from the first question to the last question on each paper.

Students may attempt any questions, but they will be graded only on the Junior paper or only on the Senior paper (i.e., not on some combination of Junior and Senior questions).

The CCC is written in schools using the CCC Online Grader. This is a 3 hour contest composed of 5 questions (either at the Junior or Senior Level). Teachers need to register in order for contests to be written in schools. There is no team competition. All students must use the CCC Online Grader. The CCC Online Grader currently supports C, C++, Python (2.x and 3.x), Pascal, Java, Perl, and PHP. The CCC consists of two distinct papers: the Junior Division paper and the Senior Division paper. Each paper consists of 5 questions. Each question is worth 15 points. The range of difficulty increases from the first question to the last question on each paper. For the Junior Division paper:

  • Questions 1 and 2: Straightforward (e.g., basic loops and conditions)
  • Questions 3 and 4: More challenging (e.g. some combination of loops, conditions and counting)
  • Question 5: Some advanced material (e.g., recursion, efficient sorting, clever algorithms)
For the Senior Division paper:
  • Questions 1 and 2: Basic algorithms (e.g., sorting, searching)
  • Questions 3 and 4: More advanced algorithms (e.g., careful counting, some mathematical reasoning)
  • Question 5: IOI level question

The Competition in each Division is marked out of a total of 75 points. Students are graded only on the number of questions successfully completed in one of the papers (Junior or Senior, not both). Prizes for Junior entries are limited to certificates and medals. Prizes for Senior entries include certificates and invitations to the CCO (Canadian Computing Olympiad).
This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Website: http://cemc.uwaterloo.ca/contests/computing.html

Managing Organization: University of Waterloo

Contact:

cemc@uwaterloo.ca

Entry Fee: $8

Eligibility:
Any secondary level student is eligible from Canada. <ul> <li>Junior Level — any student with elementary programming skills</li> <li>Senior Level — any student with intermediate to advanced programming skills</li> </ul> Any student may choose to write any level (Junior or Senior) of the contest.

Registration Closes
Feb 4, 2020 12:01am
America/Toronto

Overview

The Canadian Computing Competition (CCC) began in 1996 as a forum for high school students in Canada to learn about and enjoy aspects of programming. Top Senior contestants from the CCC are invited to attend the Canadian Computing Olympiad (CCO).

The Canadian Computing Competition (CCC) is a fun challenge for secondary school students with an interest in programming. It is an opportunity for students to test their ability in designing, understanding and implementing algorithms.

The CCC consists of two distinct paper submission divisions: the Junior Division paper and the Senior Division paper. Each paper consists of 5 questions. The range of difficulty increases from the first question to the last question on each paper.

Students may attempt any questions, but they will be graded only on the Junior paper or only on the Senior paper (i.e., not on some combination of Junior and Senior questions).

Process

The CCC is written in schools using the CCC Online Grader. This is a 3 hour contest composed of 5 questions (either at the Junior or Senior Level). Teachers need to register in order for contests to be written in schools. There is no team competition. All students must use the CCC Online Grader. The CCC Online Grader currently supports C, C++, Python (2.x and 3.x), Pascal, Java, Perl, and PHP. The CCC consists of two distinct papers: the Junior Division paper and the Senior Division paper. Each paper consists of 5 questions. Each question is worth 15 points. The range of difficulty increases from the first question to the last question on each paper. For the Junior Division paper:
  • Questions 1 and 2: Straightforward (e.g., basic loops and conditions)
  • Questions 3 and 4: More challenging (e.g. some combination of loops, conditions and counting)
  • Question 5: Some advanced material (e.g., recursion, efficient sorting, clever algorithms)
For the Senior Division paper:
  • Questions 1 and 2: Basic algorithms (e.g., sorting, searching)
  • Questions 3 and 4: More advanced algorithms (e.g., careful counting, some mathematical reasoning)
  • Question 5: IOI level question

Criteria

The Competition in each Division is marked out of a total of 75 points. Students are graded only on the number of questions successfully completed in one of the papers (Junior or Senior, not both). Prizes for Junior entries are limited to certificates and medals. Prizes for Senior entries include certificates and invitations to the CCO (Canadian Computing Olympiad).

Awards

This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Participate

Website: http://cemc.uwaterloo.ca/contests/computing.html

Managing Organization: University of Waterloo

Contact:

cemc@uwaterloo.ca

Entry Fee: $8

Eligibility:
Any secondary level student is eligible from Canada. <ul> <li>Junior Level — any student with elementary programming skills</li> <li>Senior Level — any student with intermediate to advanced programming skills</li> </ul> Any student may choose to write any level (Junior or Senior) of the contest.

Deadlines

Registration Closes
Feb 4, 2020 12:01am
America/Toronto