American Computer Science League

Ages:Elementary, Middle School, High School

Type:Exam

Categories:Coding & Computer Science, STEM

Scope:International

Registration Opens
Sep 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York

Registration Closes
Dec 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York

ACSL administers computer science contests for junior and senior high school students, publishes a newsletter containing the results of each contest and items of interest, and awards prizes (computer equipment, books, and trophies) to outstanding students and schools at local and regional levels. This past year, our 42nd year of operation, about 450 school teams in the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa and Asia participated..

1. ACSL will post its Category Descriptions on its wiki pages at http://www.categories.acsl.org . The wiki pages contain the rules for each category and some sample problems and solutions. Team advisors will use the pages and other sample problems to prepare students for the short answer test.

2. Prior to each contest, ACSL will send the team advisor an e-mail file that contains the short answer questions, the programming problem and solutions for both.

3. The team advisor will make copies of the contest questions. Note that for one registration fee every student at a school may take the tests. However, if a school registers for more than one division, a student may only take one of the tests.

4. The team advisor will administer the short answer test and score the results. One point is awarded for each answer that matches the ACSL solution. The time limit is 30 minutes for the Senior, Intermediate Junior and Elementary tests. The time limit is 50 minutes for the Classroom division test. The only materials allowed for the short answer tests are plain paper and a writing implement. Calculators are not allowed.

5. The advisor will give each student a copy of the programming problem. Students have up to 72 hours to submit a programming solution to the advisor. Students must work alone in solving the programming problem. The advisor will run the ACSL test data on each student's programming solution. The program must accept all data in one run of the program. If the program stops for any reason, the program may not be restarted to enter more data. The advisor will award one point for each program output that matches ACSL's test output.

The American Computer Science League consists of five divisions to appeal to the varying computing abilities and interests of students. All students at a school can take the tests but only one test. A team score is the sum of the best 3 or 5 best scores each test. Those scores can come from different students each contest. Prizes are awarded to top scoring students and teams based on cumulative scores after the 4th test. The competition consists of 4 contests. Each is held at the participating school thereby eliminating the need for travel, and an unlimited number of students from all grade levels may compete at each school. A school's score is the sum of the scores of its three or five highest-scoring students. In each contest, students are given short theoretical and applied questions, and then a programming problem to solve within the following three days. Programming is done on any school or home computer using any language allowed by the advisor. A faculty advisor administers the contest at each school and results are returned to ACSL for tabulation. At the end of the year, an Invitational Team All-Star Contest, based upon cumulative scores, is held at a common site. 1. Based upon cumulative results after the four contests, ACSL will invite the top scoring teams in each division to complete at its All-Star Contest. At the All-star Contest, prizes are awarded to top scoring teams and to top scoring students. Also prizes are awarded to students and teams based upon cumulative scores after Contest #4 based upon region.

1. A student's score is the sum of his/her scores on the short answer test and the programming problem. A maximum score for any one student is 10 points ( 5 + 5). 2. The team score is the sum of the best 3 or 5 student scores for that contest. 3. The advisor will complete the ACSL Score Form found at https://acsl2019.page.link/contest1-scores and submit by the listed contest end date. If a student score of 10 is reported, the advisor must also attach the programming file for that student.
This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Website: www.acsl.org

Managing Organization: American Computer Science League

Contact:

info@acsl.org

Entry Fee: Only one team per division: 1 team $125; 2 teams $225; 3 teams $300; 4 teams $350

Eligibility:
International Elementary, Middle, and High School students

Registration Opens
Sep 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York

Registration Closes
Dec 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York

Overview

ACSL administers computer science contests for junior and senior high school students, publishes a newsletter containing the results of each contest and items of interest, and awards prizes (computer equipment, books, and trophies) to outstanding students and schools at local and regional levels. This past year, our 42nd year of operation, about 450 school teams in the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa and Asia participated..

1. ACSL will post its Category Descriptions on its wiki pages at http://www.categories.acsl.org . The wiki pages contain the rules for each category and some sample problems and solutions. Team advisors will use the pages and other sample problems to prepare students for the short answer test.

2. Prior to each contest, ACSL will send the team advisor an e-mail file that contains the short answer questions, the programming problem and solutions for both.

3. The team advisor will make copies of the contest questions. Note that for one registration fee every student at a school may take the tests. However, if a school registers for more than one division, a student may only take one of the tests.

4. The team advisor will administer the short answer test and score the results. One point is awarded for each answer that matches the ACSL solution. The time limit is 30 minutes for the Senior, Intermediate Junior and Elementary tests. The time limit is 50 minutes for the Classroom division test. The only materials allowed for the short answer tests are plain paper and a writing implement. Calculators are not allowed.

5. The advisor will give each student a copy of the programming problem. Students have up to 72 hours to submit a programming solution to the advisor. Students must work alone in solving the programming problem. The advisor will run the ACSL test data on each student's programming solution. The program must accept all data in one run of the program. If the program stops for any reason, the program may not be restarted to enter more data. The advisor will award one point for each program output that matches ACSL's test output.

Process

The American Computer Science League consists of five divisions to appeal to the varying computing abilities and interests of students. All students at a school can take the tests but only one test. A team score is the sum of the best 3 or 5 best scores each test. Those scores can come from different students each contest. Prizes are awarded to top scoring students and teams based on cumulative scores after the 4th test. The competition consists of 4 contests. Each is held at the participating school thereby eliminating the need for travel, and an unlimited number of students from all grade levels may compete at each school. A school's score is the sum of the scores of its three or five highest-scoring students. In each contest, students are given short theoretical and applied questions, and then a programming problem to solve within the following three days. Programming is done on any school or home computer using any language allowed by the advisor. A faculty advisor administers the contest at each school and results are returned to ACSL for tabulation. At the end of the year, an Invitational Team All-Star Contest, based upon cumulative scores, is held at a common site. 1. Based upon cumulative results after the four contests, ACSL will invite the top scoring teams in each division to complete at its All-Star Contest. At the All-star Contest, prizes are awarded to top scoring teams and to top scoring students. Also prizes are awarded to students and teams based upon cumulative scores after Contest #4 based upon region.

Criteria

1. A student's score is the sum of his/her scores on the short answer test and the programming problem. A maximum score for any one student is 10 points ( 5 + 5). 2. The team score is the sum of the best 3 or 5 student scores for that contest. 3. The advisor will complete the ACSL Score Form found at https://acsl2019.page.link/contest1-scores and submit by the listed contest end date. If a student score of 10 is reported, the advisor must also attach the programming file for that student.

Awards

This competition has not yet listed it's awards.

Participate

Website: www.acsl.org

Managing Organization: American Computer Science League

Contact:

info@acsl.org

Entry Fee: Only one team per division: 1 team $125; 2 teams $225; 3 teams $300; 4 teams $350

Eligibility:
International Elementary, Middle, and High School students

Deadlines

Registration Opens
Sep 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York

Registration Closes
Dec 1, 2019 12:01am
America/New_York